Resource Feeds

CAPE conference

ODI general feed - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 01:00
Categories: Resource Feeds

Professional Course on Disaster Management in Asia and the Pacific

ODI general feed - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 00:00
​The Professional Course on Disaster Management in Asia and the Pacific in Beijing is aimed at professionals from government agencies, international organisations, NGOs, charities and the private sector who are interested in learning about managing disasters and other crises in China and throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

Categories: Resource Feeds

Professional Course on Disaster Management in Asia and the Pacific

ODI general feed - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 00:00
​The Professional Course on Disaster Management in Asia and the Pacific in Beijing is aimed at professionals from government agencies, international organisations, NGOs, charities and the private sector who are interested in learning about managing disasters and other crises in China and throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

Categories: Resource Feeds

Global value chains in Asia: Is everyone benefitting?

ODI general feed - Fri, 09/05/2014 - 00:00
​The seminar will discuss critical issues for inclusive growth in Asia and the rest of the developing world.

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How to ensure accountability and oversight in security and justice programming

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
​A number of major UK and internationally delivered security and justice programmes have been characterised by a lack of focus on issues of accountability. In this event, Piet Biesheuvel will outline multiple models of accountability, and how accountability affects major security and justice actors. 

Categories: Resource Feeds

How to ensure accountability and oversight in security and justice programming

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
​A number of major UK and internationally delivered security and justice programmes have been characterised by a lack of focus on issues of accountability. In this event, Piet Biesheuvel will outline multiple models of accountability, and how accountability affects major security and justice actors. 

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Aid in danger: Violence against aid workers and the future of humanitarianism

ODI general feed - Tue, 08/19/2014 - 00:00
​On World Humanitarian Day join us for the launch of 'Aid in Danger: The Perils and Promise of Humanitarianism' - a hard look at violent attacks against aid workers on the frontlines of humanitarian crises.
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Are we getting things done? Rethinking operational leadership

ODI general feed - Wed, 07/30/2014 - 00:00

What does good leadership look like in humanitarian operations? How can we promote it? Join us for a panel discussion to launch ALNAP's new study, where we will discuss the findings of our literature review, survey and interviews into effective leadership.

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Who, What, When, Where: Mapping for Urban Humanitarian Response

ODI general feed - 1 hour 24 min ago
​Mapping is increasingly used by humanitarians seeking to understand complex environments and systems. Presented by ALNAP as part of our ongoing urban webinar series, this webinar looks at the use of mapping in urban humanitarian response. Two presentations, from World Vision GIS Expert Gabriele Almon and from an urban asessment expert from REACH Initiative, will be followed by a Q&A session and chance for the audience to share their own experiences mapping urban response. 
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Old Scores and New Grudges: Evolving Sino-Japanese Tensions

The deterioration in relations between China and Japan has spiraled beyond an island sovereignty dispute and risks an armed conflict neither wants. A November regional summit is a fence-mending opportunity – if the two countries’ leaders rise above nationalism and manage multiple flashpoints.

GSNE Week: Jenna LaChenaye on Re-Socializing Yourself from Practitioner to Academic

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 01:15

Hello, evalusphere! I am Jenna LaChenaye from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. As an evaluation practitioner transitioning into the world of academia, I have found myself positioned at the epicenter of tackling the learning curve that separates these two vital yet divergent arenas of evaluation. As an evaluator and lover of social research inquiry, I reveled in the pursuit of solving real world issues, completing utilization-focused reporting and training, and moving into the next challenging project. My goal was (and continues to be) to complete rigorous and professional work that addressed local issues through the tools of evaluation. I prized spending time in activities that I deemed immediately and visually impactful. Transitioning into the world of academia, however, has put me in a position of re-socialization. I must not only continue to produce useful work that is rooted in real problems, but must additionally generate products that build on the academic community’s current work and the university/department’s mission (which can often seem like two very different conversations). However, academia provides many benefits that I did not find as an independent evaluator, such as access to immense resources, funding, and an impressive community of practice. Furthermore, I have come to see the evaluator-to-academic role as even more of a service of our profession due to the value of bringing practical experience and a focus on action into the academic sphere.

Hot Tip 1: Evaluation is often misunderstood by more traditional faculty. Share your knowledge of evaluation and you will often find colleagues who have a need for your action-based skill set.

Hot Tip 2: Many universities have centers that conduct evaluation work for the school and community. Seek out and connect with these groups as a way to seamlessly transition to the academic world.

Hot Tip 3: Many universities offer mentoring and development programs. Contact your faculty development center and/or department for more information.

Hot Tip 4: Academia and the next generation of scholars can value immensely from your knowledge and experience. If you work strictly as a practitioner, consider teaching an online or adjunct course.

Lessons Learned:

  • Like any other shift in work, moving to academia comes with a learning curve as you re-socialize into the role.
  • Academia is more of a translation of practitioner evaluator work rather than the very divergent jump it seems to be.
  • Colleagues are more than happy to provide support if asked.

Rad Resources:

  • Tanya Golash-Boza, Ph.D. writes a great, simple blog on navigating the academic world and maintaining a work/life balance, a great resource for those of us who want a jump start
  • Translating evaluation reporting to a journal format can be tough. Search Eval.org for resources addressing this transition

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. SW TIG Week: Carolyn Sullins and Ladel Lewis on Cultural Competence in the Evaluation of Community Programs
  2. Deshonna Collier-Goubil on Evaluator-Practitioner Collaboration
  3. WE Week: Nick Hart on the Value of Affiliate Connections with the Academic Community

GSNE Week: Kate Westaby and Valerie Moody on How to Hit the Ground Running in your New Evaluation Position!

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 01:15

Greetings! We are Kate Westaby and Valerie Moody, new evaluators from two Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) institutes. Kate is an Evaluation Research Specialist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and Valerie is the Evaluation Coordinator at the University of Iowa Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. At the 62 CTSA institutes nationwide, program evaluation is a complex, dynamic, unpredictable environment, mandated by NIH, but implemented in a wide variety of ways by evaluators with diverse backgrounds.

Due to our personal efforts learning to adapt to these complicated surroundings, we wanted to know if there were best practices for new evaluators to orient themselves to their workplaces. Last year, we interviewed 16 new evaluators from 14 CTSA institutes to gather the most helpful strategies for learning about evaluation, thus allowing new evaluators to hit the ground running.

I felt it was like putting together a 1000 piece puzzle, but nobody gave you the cover,” — quote from a new CTSA evaluator.

Hot Tip 1: Learn the history of evaluation efforts at your workplace.New evaluators found this to be the most helpful strategy. Many suggested using programmatic documents (e.g., grant proposals, strategic goal documents, etc.) to find useful historical information. They were better able to understand evaluation needs and review progress towards those needs in a short period of time.

Hot Tip 2: Attend face-to-face meetings (or a conference) with evaluators who are doing similar work. This setting allowed new evaluators to hear what strategies others are using, what their struggles have been, and how they turned their struggles into successes. It also allowed them to establish face-to-face networks for future communication.

Hot Tip 3: Ask questions! Supervisors or colleagues can provide insight into program history, politics, and help you avoid reinventing the wheel. Don’t be afraid to speak up!

Rad Resource: For more tips on how to get comfortable in your new workplace or to look into which strategies were least helpful to our interviewees, check out our AEA 2013 poster below (or download a larger version from AEA’s public elibrary here).

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Boris Volkov on What (Internal) Evaluators Can Do to Advance Evaluation Capacity Building
  2. OPEN Week: Adrienne Zell on Evaluation for People Who Can’t Be Bothered to Do It
  3. BLP TIG Week: Carla Forrest on Using Appreciative Approaches to Drive Workplace Performance

Unhappily ever after: the fight against early marriage

ODI general feed - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 00:00
A review of the drivers and costs of early marriage, and recommendations for action.
Categories: Resource Feeds

Labs as a Large Systems Change Strategy

Networking Action - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 12:28

The concept of “labs” as a way to address complex issues is a relatively new concept.  Zaid Hassan, in the Social Labs Revolution, estimates it to be about 20 years old.  His intimate involvement in developing a number of them …

Philippines: A Competency Model for PFM Professionals

PFM blog - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 07:32
Posted by Gordon Ferrier1 Human resource aspects of public financial management (PFM) reform strategies are given less than their due in the literature. Yet they are fundamental to the success of such strategies, as a recent initiative by the Government...
Categories: Resource Feeds

GSNE Week: Alice Walters on The Art and Science of Networking

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 01:15

I’m Alice Walters, a member of AEA’s Graduate Student and New Evaluator TIG.  I am a doctoral student in human services and work as a non-profit consultant in fund development, marketing, and evaluation.  I share some networking tips, below.

Networking is needed at every career stage.  Review tips and resources to increase your effectiveness.  Enjoy using your networking skills as both art and science to see what serendipitous outcomes transpire!

Hot Tip 1:  Networking is developing informal connections with other professionals.

Building informal connections can occur any time you meet other professionals.  Don’t exclude those outside your usual networks who can be a source of unexpected developments.

Rad Resource: Developing a Strong Professional Network” by the Penn State Alumni Association 

Hot Tip 2:  Networking is more than just about a job hunt. Networking is often associated with job hunting success but it can be much more than that.  Networking can lead you to new avenues, develop new collaborations, and bring attention to your own work in new venues.

Rad Resource: Tips for Successful Business Networking10 Advantages of Business Networking” bySusan M. Heathfield

Hot Tip 3:  Networking is not really an “activity,” it is a lifestyle. Networking is not an isolated activity you add to your calendar.  Instead, it is really a process, approach, and outlook on professional relationships.

Rad Resource: Cheat Sheet: 9 Professional Networking Tips” by Jillian Kurvers

Hot Tip 4:  Networking for the shy – is easier when you don’t think of it as “networking.” Even the most outgoing people can struggle with pressure to force a connection professionally.  Instead, it is better to explore relationships by asking questions that occur naturally to you.

Rad Resource: How to Network: 12 Tips for Shy People” by Meridith Levinson

Hot Tip 5:  Networking is an art.  It’s creative, flexible, and individualistic. Use your strengths to network.  Just as art appeals differently to individuals, networking can accommodate a variety of styles.

Hot Tip 6:  Networking is a science.  It deserves study and analysis. Science is study.  Networking is thoughtful.  It seeks to connect the random dots.  Networking requires analysis of input data.  It’s not an oxymoron to look for serendipity.  Serendipity is defined as finding something valuable but not sought for.  Still, if you are looking for connections and value, you will be more likely to find them.

Hot Tip 7:  AEA is a great resource for networking. AEA is the hub of evaluation professionals.  The AEA Topical Interest Groups, conferences, and local affiliates are a great place to start. On the AEA home page go to (third tab to the right):  Read>Links of Interest>Professional Groups   http://www.eval.org/p/cm/ld/fid=69

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. OPEN Week: Erin Stack & Lindsey Patterson on Successfully Transitioning from Student to Professional
  2. Tamara Bertrand Jones on Finding and Working With a Mentor
  3. WE Week: Nick Hart on the Value of Affiliate Connections with the Academic Community

Millions of girls forced into early marriage

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 00:00

The UK government hosted a Girl Summit in London - one of the key aims was to end child marriage. New research from the Overseas Development Institute reveals some shocking abuse of teenage girls.

Categories: Resource Feeds

What does the future hold for Aid for Trade?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 00:00

As the latest round of WTO trade negotiations at Bali commences, a two year ODI-led project on Aid for Trade (AfT) is concluding. We have been examining whether and how AfT contributes to development progress. In this mini blog series, we add to the debate by asking three key actors - one institutional, one academic, one think-tank - the following question ‘What does the future hold for Aid for Trade?’ Join the debate by commenting on the proposals.

Categories: Resource Feeds

GSNE Week: Ayesha Tillman on Graduate Student and New Evaluator (GSNE) TIG Mentorship program

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Sun, 07/20/2014 - 03:38

Hello, I am Ayesha Tillman, and I have all but deposited my dissertation for a Ph.D. degree in Educational Psychology with an evaluation specialization from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Illinois). I along with Rae Clementz, Sarah Wilkey-Gordon, Tiffany Smith, Pat Barlow, and Nora Gannon-Slater are mentors in the Graduate Student and New Evaluator (GSNE) TIG Peer-Mentorship program. I have five mentees located across the U.S. including Louisiana, California, Michigan, Texas, and the Dominican Republic. So far, my participation as a mentor has been an incredibly rewarding and worthwhile endeavor.

Lessons Learned: All of my mentees joined the GSNE TIG peer-mentoring program because they were looking for someone to bounce ideas off of, share experiences with, and someone to give them tips/advice. Below is advice I have shared.

Hot Tip 1: Presenting. AEA, American Educational Research Association (AERA), and the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) are three conferences for evaluators to submit presentation proposals to. If you are uncomfortable submitting a paper, start with roundtable and poster presentations.

Hot Tip 2: Publishing. Publishing in evaluation can be tricky. Evaluation journals (and conferences) do not want submissions about the results of the evaluation. Research on evaluation and reflections on evaluation practice are well suited for publication. For example, the American Journal of Evaluation “explores decisions and challenges related to conceptualizing, designing and conducting evaluations.”

Hot Tip 3: Capacity building. The workshops at the AEA conference, the AEA summer evaluation institute, and AEA eStudies are great professional development opportunities for evaluators. The AEA Graduate Education Diversity Internship Program is an awesome opportunity for graduate students of color and from other under-represented groups who would like to extend their research capacities to evaluation.

Rad Resources:

  • GSNE mentorship program mentees. If you are interested in being a mentee, make sure you are a member of the GSNE TIG. You will receive an email once a quarter with the opportunity to become a mentee. If you are interested in being paired with a GSNE mentor, please send an email to Kristin Woods.
  • GSNE mentorship program mentors. If you are interested in being a mentor, you should have been an AEA member for two or more years and have attended at least one annual conference. If you are interested and willing to be a GSNE mentor, please send an email to Kristin Woods.
  • GSNE TIG Facebook page. The GSNE Facebook group is a great place to connect with other graduate student and new evaluators. We share resources, opinions, advice, and network on Facebook.

AEA is celebrating GSNE Week with our colleagues in the Graduate Student and New Evaluators AEA Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our GSNE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. GSNE Week: Kristin Woods on Gaining Practical Experience as a New Evaluator
  2. Tamara Bertrand Jones on Finding and Working With a Mentor
  3. STEM TIG Week: Ayesha Tillman on Advice to New Evaluators

Sheila B Robinson on EvalYear: A Taste of 2015 and a bit of Alphabet Soup to Whet Your Appetite

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Sat, 07/19/2014 - 06:38

Good morning! I’m Sheila B Robinson, aea365′s Lead Curator and sometimes Saturday contributor. I love to share evaluation news and, ever the teacher, I look for opportunities to educate aea365 readers. Today’s lesson is about EvalYear, the International Year of Evaluation. If you haven’t yet heard about this, it’s time to get reading!

In October 2013 in São Paulo, Brazil at the Third International Conference on National Evaluation Capacities it was announced that 2015 would be the International Year of Evaluation (EvalYear). EvalPartners, the global movement to strengthen national evaluation capacities, is behind the effort, and it’s a big effort! Two leading partners and 47 core partners (of which AEA is one) along with 1580 evaluators/activists have joined or expressed interest in the declaration of EvalYear.

“The aim of designating 2015 as the International Year of Evaluation is to advocate and promote evaluation and evidence-based policy making at international, regional, national and local levels.”

Image credit: Hans Watson via Flickr

Lesson Learned: When you visit the EvalYear website and start reading, you will come across no fewer than 15 acronyms! Most are written out, but not all are (or are not written out on every page), so to prepare, have a little taste of alphabet soup!

  • IOCE – International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation
  • IEG – Independent Evaluation Group
  • OECD/DAC – Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development / Development Assistance Committee
  • VOPE – Voluntary Organization of Professional Evaluators
  • MDGs – Millennium Development Goals
  • SDGs – Sustainable Development Goals
  • UNEG – United Nations Evaluation Group
  • ECG – Evaluation Cooperation Group
  • ALNAP – Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance 
  • TF – Task Force
  • NECD – National Evaluation Capacity Development
  • QCPR - Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review
  • CSO – Civil Society Organization
  • ECD – Evaluation Capacity Development
  • EFGR - Equity Focused and Gender Responsive

“EvalYear will position evaluation in the policy arena, by raising awareness of the importance of embedding monitoring and evaluation systems in the development and implementation of the forthcoming Sustainable Development Goals, and all other critical local contextualized goals, at the international and national levels. EvalYear is about taking mutual responsibility for policies and social action through greater understanding, transparency, and constructive dialogue.”

Hot Tip: Visit EvalYear to learn more and consider how you will get involved!

Rad Resources: Check out the resource center for presentations and updates. The EvalYear logo and brochure is currently available in 18 languages and it is being translated in to many more languages.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Neha Karkara on the Evaluation Advocacy Toolkit
  2. Susan Kistler on VOPEs and the EvalPartners Innovation Challenge
  3. Amir Fallah on Resources for International Evaluators