Resource Feeds

CAPE conference

ODI general feed - Tue, 11/18/2014 - 01:00
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Advanced course on conflict, crisis and transitions - 2014

ODI general feed - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 00:00
​The Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute and the Post-war Reconstruction and Development Unit (PRDU) at the University of York are pleased to offer their fifth annual ‘Advanced Course on Conflict, Crisis and Transitions’. The week-long programme targeting mid-career and senior professionals will be held on the parkland campus of the University of York.
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UK Water Forum: Water equity in the new development era

ODI general feed - Thu, 05/15/2014 - 00:00
​A Flagship event with an international and UK audience to identify major challenges facing water services and resource management post-2015
Categories: Resource Feeds

Can democracy deliver for development? Lessons from Brazil, India and Ghana

ODI general feed - Tue, 05/13/2014 - 00:00

What does the growing disillusionment across both the developed and the developing world about the way democracy works mean for the promise of democracy? Drawing on research from three leading democracies in the developing world, this event will explore whether and how these systems can deliver for their populations - and what this means for broader debates on institutions and development.

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Development and equity: can democracy deliver? Lessons from Brazil, India and Ghana

ODI general feed - Tue, 05/13/2014 - 00:00

What does the growing disillusionment across both the developed and the developing world about the way democracy works mean for the promise of democracy? Drawing on research from three leading democracies in the developing world, this event will explore whether and how these systems can deliver for their populations - and what this means for broader debates on institutions and development.

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A political approach to security and justice programming: making it work in practice

ODI general feed - Mon, 05/12/2014 - 00:00
​This first seminar in the Security and justice seminar series will explore how politically-informed programming can be operationalised, with Dr Andrew Rathmell from the University of Exeter.

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Taking a political approach to security and justice programming: how to make this work in practice?

ODI general feed - Mon, 05/12/2014 - 00:00
​This first seminar in the Security and justice seminar series will explore how politically-informed programming can be operationalised, with Dr Andrew Rathmell from the University of Exeter.

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The global climate policy conference 2014

ODI general feed - Wed, 05/07/2014 - 00:00
This conference brings together researchers and analysts from academia and think-tanks, together with negotiators and other practitioners to identify new economic, social and political ideas and analysis to help move international climate negotiations forward.
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Everybody wins: bridging the gap between scientific and local communities

ODI general feed - Tue, 05/06/2014 - 00:00
​This event examines how participatory games and exercises can bring together the local and scientific knowledge produced by at-risk people, humanitarian and development agencies and those with formal scientific and technological training to enable communities to become more resilient in the face of disasters

 

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Everybody wins: bridging the gap between scientific and local communities

ODI general feed - Tue, 05/06/2014 - 00:00
​This event examines how participatory games and exercises can bring together the local and scientific knowledge produced by at-risk people, humanitarian and development agencies and those with formal scientific and technological training to enable communities to become more resilient in the face of disasters

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Zambia at 50: Engaging diaspora in inclusive development

ODI general feed - Wed, 04/30/2014 - 00:00

The launch of the Roundtable Report and offer participants the opportunity to reflect on the proceedings of the DfAD Zambia Roundtable discussion held  in partnership with Diaspora Support Initiative (DSI) Zambia.

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Regional integration in South Asia: trends, challenges and prospects

ODI general feed - Wed, 04/30/2014 - 00:00
This book presents an assessment of trade and economic co-operation among South Asian nations and highlights policy issues to foster regional integration.
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Rethinking disaster risk reduction: making better decisions on HFA2

ODI general feed - Wed, 04/30/2014 - 00:00
Why haven't disaster risk assessments been effective in informing development plans and public and private sector decisions? This event loos at the proliferation and variety of disaster risk assessments conducted over the last 10 years. Speakers will share their views on what HFA2 should include to improve formulation, production and policy influence of risk assessments.
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Private funding of humanitarian aid: is this the future?

ODI general feed - Tue, 04/29/2014 - 00:00
As humanitarian needs grow and the budgets of many traditional donor governments reduce, aid agencies are looking to a diverse set of new funding sources. This event will look at the real value of private giving, the benefits in comparison to other sources of funding, who the current funders are and if they hold the answer to the future of humanitarian financing. 

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Can social protection and labour programmes promote social inclusion?

ODI general feed - Mon, 04/28/2014 - 00:00

This symposium presents the findings of a three year research project that explored the impact of different social protection and labour programme interventions on social inclusion in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India and Nepal. The symposium will serve as a forum for researchers and development practitioners to discuss evidence from the field and its implications for policy and practice.

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Earth Day 2015 Should Focus on Tomorrow’s Bottom Line

Volans - 9 hours 41 min ago
On Earth Day’s 44th birthday John Elkington teamed up with The B Team’s co-founder and co-chair, Jochen Zeitz, to write a blog for The Huffington Post on the need for…

Read more >
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EPE TIG Week: Yvonne M. Watson on Buying Green Today to Save and Sustain Our Tomorrow

Hi everyone!  I’m Yvonne M. Watson, an Evaluator in U.S. EPA’s Evaluation Support Division and Chair of AEA’s Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group.  As we celebrate Earth Week in April and prepare for the annual American Evaluation Association  (AEA) conference in October, the theme of sustainability looms large.

As I think about an area where organizations and individuals can make a significant difference to ensure a sustainable future, consumer choice and green purchasing/procurement comes to mind.  The federal government’s role as the leading purchaser of green products is vital to ensuring a sustainable future.  Equally important is the role that households and individuals play in this equation.

Lesson Learned: According to Fischer’s 2010 report, Green Procurement: Overview and Issues for Congress, at the institutional level, federal government procurement accounts for $500 billion annually. Because of its size and purchasing power, the federal government influence on the market is broad—“affecting manufacturing (product planning and development), and purchasing (large institutions and States that mimic federal specifications) both nationally, and internationally.  Established in 1993, the purpose of EPA’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) Program is to: 1) achieve dramatic reductions in the environmental footprint of federal purchasing through creation of guidelines, tools, recognition programs, environmental standards and other incentives and requirements, and (b) make the overall consumer marketplace more sustainable through federal leadership.  In 2011, the EPP program initiated an evaluation to examine the changes in spending on green products across the federal government since 2001. The results indicate greater awareness and positive attitudes towards green procurement among federal purchasers surveyed.

At the individual level, consumers not only vote with their feet – they vote with their purses and wallets too, through the purchase of food, cars, electronics, clothes and a host of other services. In addition, the prominence of green and eco-labels is a prime example of the manufacturing industry’s response to greater demand from consumers who look for green products.  During Earth Week, I encourage organizations, individuals and evaluators alike to take a step back and assess our individual and collective consumer purchasing decisions and the implications for a sustainable future.  After all, the purchasing choices we make today affect the future we have tomorrow.

Rad Resources: EPA’s Greener Products website provides information for consumers, manufacturers and institutional purchasers related to green products.

The EPP Evaluation Report is available here.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. EPE Week: Annelise Carleton-Hug on Evaluating Your Own Environmental Impact
  2. David Erickson on Measuring the Social Impact of Investments
  3. Canadian Evaluation Conference – Going Green, Gold, and Global

When is redistribution popular? Social conflict and the politics of inequality

ODI general feed - 11 hours 21 min ago
This working paper analyses perception data for over 15 thousand citizens in 40 countries and finds that when individuals perceive the adverse social effects of inequality, it is more likely that they demand more redistribution from their governments. However the challenge is for governments and practitioners to act quickly when inequality is starting to rise in order to capitalise the support towards redistributive policies
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Myanmar’s Military: Back to the Barracks?

In its latest briefing, Myanmar’s Military: Back to the Barracks?, the International Crisis Group examines the military’s key role in political and economic reforms. The military has preserved its essential interests, including through the constitution, while reducing its share of power. But the armed forces are still far from having dealt with the legacy of dictatorship.

EPE TIG Week: Andy Rowe on Cats and Climate Change

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 01:15

Andy Rowe here, I evaluate sustainable development and natural resource interventions.  I am convinced evaluation is facing a key adapt or decline juncture.

Connectivity is the mechanism enabling us to understand how interventions reach to the public interest and effects in the natural system. Our siloed governance approaches come from cost and accountability structures in the for-profit sector.  For-profits recognize the importance of connections to the larger mission and judges performance accordingly; now in the mission includes sustainability.  Major corporations such as Mars and WalMart are acting decisively to ensure sustainable supply chains, which they judge essential to survival of their businesses.  We need to begin the process of incorporating sustainability into evaluation.

The story of how domesticated cats contribute to climate change illustrates how obscure but important these causal connections can be.

Lesson Learned: Domesticated cats living with humans, and feral cats are a significant predator of songbirds taking an estimated 40% annually.  Birds carry a parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The unharmful parasite departs in stools, often in litter, which ends up in landfills. Landfills are often connected to the sea via groundwater and streams and the parasites enter coastal waters where bivalves ingest them.  Sea otters love bivalves ingesting the parasite, which attacks the otter brains.  Poor otters.

Another system connects with our story. Fertilizer and waste from sewage treatment and other sources deliver nutrients to the sea causing algal growth in the water that weaken sea grasses.  Otters address the effects of excessive nutrient loading on grasses keeping the sea grasses alive.  Sea grasses are amazingly effective at storing carbon – with the help of otters Pacific sea grasses store the equivalent of annual carbon dioxide emissions from 3 to 6 million cars.

So, cats contribute to climate change via mechanisms that are far from transparent.  As evaluators we need to attend to the connections from the intervention to important effects, including effects in the natural system.  By tracing connectivity within and across systems, evaluation can play an important role in ensuring that interventions are designed and undertaken so that the world we leave for our grandchildren is at least as good as the world we inherited.  It is time that sustainability becomes an expected element in evaluation.  Several years ago the National Academy of Science gave sustainability science a room of its own –time now for sustainability to become a required element in our Standards.

Lesson Learned:  Take a look at sustainability in the for-profit sector:  1. Mars Corporation here and here and 2. Walmart here.

Rad Resources:  Otters and weeds:

Also, see Sustainability Science Room of Its Own by William C. Clark (2007).

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Environmental Program Evaluation TIG Week with our colleagues in the Environmental Program Evaluation Topical Interest Group. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from our EPE TIG members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. EPE Week: Andy Rowe on Time for Evaluators to Get Ahead of the Curve
  2. EPE Week: Tracy Dyke-Redmond on Evaluating Adaptation Plans
  3. Climate Ed Eval Week: John Baek on Online Collection of Climate Knowledge Assessment Items