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Basics and beyond: What drives national progress in education?

ODI general feed - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 00:00

​This public event takes us beyond discussions on global goals to examine political and socio-economic factors that drive education progress at a national level, looking particularly at improvements in quality at primary level and expanding access to post-primary education. 

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Basics and beyond: What drives national progress in education?

ODI general feed - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 00:00
Focussing on case studies in Chile, Indonesia, Mongolia and Kenya that were conducted as part of ODI's Development Progress project, this event examined the factors improving education quality at a national level.
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Basics and beyond: What drives national progress in education?

ODI general feed - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 00:00
​This public event takes us beyond discussions on global goals to examine political and socio-economic factors that drive education progress at a national level, looking particularly at improvements in quality at primary level and expanding access to post-primary education. Country case studies conducted as part of ODI’s Development Progress project offer lessons particular to these areas, and provide some broader learning for current efforts to focus on education systems as a whole.
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When is Business at its Best? New Shared Value Motiongraphic

FSG - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 06:11
Watch When is Business at its Best? and learn about the Shared Value Initiative in less than 90 seconds.
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Crisis Group announces next President & CEO Jean-Marie Guéhenno

Crisis Group is pleased to announce Jean-Marie Guéhenno will be the organisation’s next President & Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Guéhenno served as the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Peacekeeping Operations from 2000-2008, and in 2012, as Deputy Joint Special Envoy of the United Nations and the League of Arab States on Syria. He left his post as Deputy Joint Special Envoy to chair the commission that prepared the white paper on French defence and national security in 2013. He is currently a professor and Director of the Center for International Conflict Resolution at Columbia University.

Cultural Competence Week: Dominica McBride on The Importance of Cultural Competence

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 01:15

Hi, my name is Dominica McBride and I’m a member of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group, along with CEO of Become, Inc., a nonprofit using culturally responsive program evaluation as a tool in realizing social justice. I also teach Diversity at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Lesson Learned: Unfortunately, too often, I see people pay “lip service” to cultural competence but don’t exert the effort needed to make the psychological changes necessary to make real structural change. Many people don’t see the profound importance of cultural competence. The purpose of this construct is not only so we (whoever the “we” is – evaluators, teachers, medical doctors) can communicate effectively and accomplish a given collective goal with people of any cultural background. It is also to achieve social equality so we can realize the US’s foundational philosophy; as the Declaration of Independence asserts, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

I want to take this time to reiterate the importance of cultural competence or responsiveness through showing its relevance today with a focus on macro level issues. Structural discrimination is still alive and well. Structural discrimination is the unintended discrimination that is embedded in institutions, perpetuating oppression. This type of discrimination continues to show up in institutions like the criminal justice system, education, housing and healthcare. For examples:

  • Michelle Alexandar writes, “More African American men were disenfranchised due to felony convictions in 2004 than in 1870.” The great majority of these convictions are due to drug-related felonies, despite the fact that African Americans and Caucasians use and deal at equal rates.
  • The tax structure lays the groundwork for unequal resource distribution to schools, with schools in more disadvantaged areas receiving less resources, thus perpetuating the cycle of disproportionate unemployment in more impoverished communities.

Our role as culturally competent or culturally responsive evaluators is not only to be aware of how we influence a situation and how culture can influence participants and a program but also to contribute to structural, societal changes for the greater, collective good. This means observing both the overt and the latent in programs and their contexts, saying the hard truths, and taking risks. This means being an advocate and catalyst.

Rad Resources: The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander provides a rich description and statistics showing the morphing of Jim Crow into present day structural discrimination in the criminal justice system.

Check out a video, The Unequal Opportunity Race, demonstrating some contextual barriers that have and continue to create obstacles to equality.

This week, we’re diving into issues of Cultural Competence in Evaluation with AEA’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Cultural Competence Week: Melanie Hwalek on the Adoption of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation – Moving From Policy to Practice and Practice to Policy
  2. Cultural Competence Week: Karen Anderson on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Resources
  3. Cultural Competence Week: Dominica McBride on AEA 2013 and Spreading the Word on Cultural Competence

Israel’s Hamas Challenge: The Third Way

The kidnapping and murder of three Israeli yeshiva students — and the extensive Israeli military campaign against Hamas, members of which Israel presumes to have perpetrated the act – illustrate the urgency of revisiting Israel’s policy options toward the Islamist group. Largely ignored since the last outbreak of violence, the issue is today again on the public agenda. How should Israel deal with Hamas?

Health service gaps in Africa led to Ebola epidemic

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00
Lisa Denney looks at the current Ebola crisis and concludes that continued and strengthened support needs to be focused on building the capacities of national health and sanitation systems to respond to emergencies so that such unnecessary loss of life is prevented in the future.
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Unbalanced progress: what political dynamics mean for education access and quality

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00
To support Development Progress' education case studies, this working paper looks at what effect political dynamics have on the aspects of education being examined, drawing three key messages which have relevance for the education sector far beyond the case study countries at hand.
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National progress in education

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00

As part of our education case study launch, we've asked a number of experts to consider what we have learned about education progress – in some cases globally and in others from a country perspective – highlighting the biggest victories, trade-offs, and lessons as we move toward a new set of post-2015 goals.

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Can aid donors help support LGBT rights in developing countries?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00

A flagship half-day event for key UK and international stakeholders exploring whether international aid can play a role in defending lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) rights in developing countries.

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Can aid and LGBT rights be compatible in developing countries?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00

The Kaleidoscope Trust and ODI are hosting a public half-day conference, bringing together top policy-makers, activists and experts to discuss whether foreign donors can – and should – promote Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) rights in developing countries.

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Can aid donors help support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights in developing countries?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00

A flagship half-day event for key UK and international stakeholders organised by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and The Kaleidoscope Trust to explore whether international aid can play a role in defending  LGBT rights in developing countries.

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Can aid donors help support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights in developing countries?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00

The Kaleidoscope Trust and the Overseas Development Institute are hosting a  public half-day conference on the role of aid donors in addressing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) rights in developing countries.

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Does foreign aid help – or hinder – lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights in developing countries?

ODI general feed - Mon, 07/07/2014 - 00:00
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Cultural Competence Week: Rupu Gupta and Tamara Bertrand Jones on Cultural Competence Working Group Evaluation

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Sun, 07/06/2014 - 01:15

Hello, we are Rupu Gupta and Tamara Bertrand Jones, members of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence Dissemination Working Group (CCWG). We lead the Research and Evaluation subgroup and are developing strategies to understand how the larger working group is achieving its goals.

Lesson Learned: Purpose of Research and Evaluation subgroup. We started our work within this subgroup acknowledging that a systematic assessment of how the CCWG is achieving its goal is critical to document its accomplishments over time. We are a group of evaluators, so of course evaluation is part of our work.

In our initial discussions about the CCWG, we considered the group’s goals in general, and eventually decided to focus on two goals as a starting point:

  • Increasing awareness of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Statement and resources; and
  • Increasing use and application of the concepts embedded in the Statement.

However, it was apparent that as we began our efforts we needed to learn, first and foremost, the different mechanisms through which the CCWG had been sharing the Statement.

Our post today is about our ongoing efforts examining the various ways the working group, with 22 members, has been disseminating the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence.

Within this group, we are currently pilot-testing a qualitative and quantitative online survey focusing on:

 

  1. Domains within which the Statement was shared (e.g., teaching, practice, and policy);
  2. Specific activities undertaken;
  3. Format of the dissemination (e.g., presentation, social media, and web material)
  4. Audiences with whom it was shared; and
  5. Outcomes of the activities.

Lesson Learned: Preliminary Findings. Based on the responses of a sample of the CCWG members, we learned that:

  1. The group primarily shared the statement equally in the domains of teaching, practice, and policy.
  2. The audiences with whom they shared the statement included federal policy makers, AEA members, pre-doctoral fellows, funders, and anyone interested in learning about evaluation.
  3. This was reflected in their activities ranging from disseminating the Statement at the federal level (e.g., through a letter to then Secretary of State Hillary Clinton), professional development efforts at AEA conferences, and webinars.
  4. The primary outcome of the group’s efforts was to increase knowledge of the statement and strategies and practices for culturally competent evaluation

Lesson Learned: Next Steps. We will continue to gather more information from the CCWG to get a complete picture of the ways in which the group has been disseminating the Statement. The results of the online survey will be used to understand the outcomes of interest for the group, so as to develop a longer-term evaluation plan for the CCWG’s efforts.

Rad Resource: See AEA’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation

This week, we’re diving into issues of Cultural Competence in Evaluation with AEA’s Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

 

 

Related posts:

  1. Cultural Competence Week: Melanie Hwalek on Cultural Competence Dissemination in Policy
  2. Cultural Competence Week: Melanie Hwalek on the Adoption of the AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation – Moving From Policy to Practice and Practice to Policy
  3. Cultural Competence Week: Cindy Crusto and Osman Ozturgut on the Re-Introduction to AEA Public Statement on Cultural Competence in Evaluation Dissemination Working Group and Reminder to Examine the “Self”

From decline to recovery: post-primary education in Mongolia

ODI general feed - Sun, 07/06/2014 - 00:00
​Since the mid-1990s, Mongolia has recovered from the most severe drop in post-primary education enrolment seen in any Central Asian transition economy, now achieving enrolment rates that rival its neighbours and even those of some OECD countries. Since 1994, school life expectancy has nearly doubled, with new starters in 2010 expected to complete more than 14 years of education. In addition, significant gains in equity have been made, with access gaps between urban and rural, rich and poor, and girls and boys all having narrowed since the transition period.
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Beyond basics: the growth of post-primary education in Kenya

ODI general feed - Sun, 07/06/2014 - 00:00
​This study describes the remarkable progress in education access at the post-primary level in Kenya in the last decade and the driving factors behind it. School life expectancy in Kenya increased by a third in the last decade, from 8.4 years in 2000 to 11 years in 2009 - outpacing most other African countries. This figure captures improvements in the transition rate from primary to secondary level, a jump in completion rates at secondary level and quadrupled enrolment to tertiary education (from a very low base). Gender equity is another area of long-term progress in post-primary education in Kenya.
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Towards better education quality: Indonesia’s promising path

ODI general feed - Sun, 07/06/2014 - 00:00
​Since 2000, Indonesia has made huge efforts to improve educational outcomes, as measured by increased literacy, progress in international assessment results, and completion of primary and lower-secondary education in line with the government’s policy on nine years of compulsory education. As in many other developing countries, it has proved to be a great challenge to move beyond improving access to education and towards achieving meaningful gains in the quality and equity of education, but there have been some positive trends in this regard.
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Improvements in the quality of basic education: Chile's experience

ODI general feed - Sun, 07/06/2014 - 00:00
​Chile is one of the few countries to have improved the quality of its basic education significantly in recent decades. Following the pro-market reforms of the Pinochet years, concerted efforts to improve the quality of education began in the 1990s. As a result of these efforts, there have been clear improvements in the country’s performance in national and international test scores. Chile has moved from the middle of the pack to pole position in education quality, outperforming other countries in the region in all subjects in the 2006, 2009 and 2012 PISA examinations (Programme for International Student Assessment). Improvements in quality have taken place alongside substantial cumulative improvements in access, retention, repetition and completion rates in basic education, as well as significant progress on other socioeconomic factors.
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