Resource Feeds

Histories of humanitarian action in the Middle East and North Africa

ODI general feed - Wed, 09/03/2014 - 00:00
There is a rich history of humanitarian action in the Middle East and North Africa, but it is often overlooked and poorly understood. This collection of papers offers an introduction to the history and concepts of humanitarian action in the Middle East and North Africa, to help shed light on humanitarian action today.
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Our collective interest – time to rethink EU governance

ODI general feed - Wed, 09/03/2014 - 00:00
The question today is whether Europe’s governments are capable of delivering something more than the indecision, petty-squabbling and political inertia that has done so much to erode the credibility of the EU at home and abroad.
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ICGFM Issues Call for Speakers for its Winter Conference, December 1-3, 2014, Washington, DC

PFM blog - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 12:08
Posted by David Nummy, ICGFM Vice-President for Programs The International Consortium on Governmental Financial Management (ICGFM) will hold its Winter Conference from December 1-3, 2014, at the International Monetary Fund, conducted in partnership with the Fiscal Affairs Department (FAD). The...
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p2i Week: Kate Haley Goldman on Using p2i Outside of AEA

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 01:14

I’m Kate Haley Goldman, and I’m the co-owner of Audience Viewpoints Consulting. We work with informal science and arts and cultural institutions.

Last year, I applied p2i Design principles to a presentation I gave at the Visitor Studies Association conference. It was the best way to showcase my content for several reasons. First, it fit my topic – Nimble Evaluation, which focused on the overlap between design thinking and rapid iteration. Second, I was trained in the academic-style approach to reporting but that clashed with the key approaches of the technology developers I work with. My developer friends found our reports and presentations too dense, too dull, and non-actionable. My academic colleagues were concerned that without graphs and extensive background, our complex work would be taken out of context and watered down. The p2i approach to presenting helped bridge these ideas.

While I’d made similar presentations within the tech field for years, I hadn’t tried it with researchers and evaluators. Nonetheless, I took a leap and employed the lessons from the Potent Presentations Initiative and my graphic designer friends and presented slides in their style when I talked about Nimble Evaluation at the VSA conference.  No graphs, few words, mostly pictures. Full-bleed color pictures help the audience deepen their connection to the context and the lack of bullets allow them to focus on the speaker.

Rad Resource: Since then I’ve moved the majority of my presentations to this style. I’ve also discovered the p2i Rad Resources, which give not only examples of how to present in this more effective manner, but they do so in ways that academic, data-driven evaluators can appreciate. In particular, I’d like to draw attention to the Design webinar session hosted by Stephanie Evergreen, which can be found on the p2i homepage.

Because Stephanie offers the rationale for the design choices made, you can not only make more effective presentations but understand why they are effective. You’ll still need the same amount of preparation time (or perhaps even more) for your slides, as fewer words on the screen forces you to be an organized and engaging speaker. We’ve found the Rad Resources at p2i help support and reinforce better speaking in all our presentations, at conferences and elsewhere.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating p2i Week with AEA members who have used our Potent Presentations Initiative. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from members who have used p2i strategies in their presentations. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Stephanie Evergreen on the Potent Presentations Initiative Website
  2. Stephanie Evergreen on p2i at Eval12
  3. Susan Kistler on the (Mostly) Joys of Using (Free) Haiku Deck to Make Gorgeous Slides

Responsibility, legitimacy, morality: Chinese humanitarianism in historical perspective

ODI general feed - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 00:00
China’s rising economic power has meant that it is now playing a bigger role in humanitarian aid. However there is widespread belief that China does not always adhere to established humanitarian norms and practices. This working paper examines how China’s cultural heritage has shaped the country’s approach to humanitarian action throughout history.
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The 'Chinese way'? The evolution of Chinese humanitarianism

ODI general feed - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 00:00
China’s rising economic power has meant that it is now playing a bigger role in humanitarian aid. This policy brief examines the history and cultural values at the heart of China’s approach to humanitarianism and the ways to address existing gaps between China and other humanitarian actors.
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p2i Week: Taj Carson on Hacking the Ignite Presentation Format

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 13:14

I’m Taj Carson and I’m the CEO of CRC, where we help organizations to tell their stories using data and data visualization. Last year, the Data Visualization & Reporting TIG hosted an Ignite session at the annual conference. I knew our work in mapping, including the development of the Baltimore DataMind, would be a great way to introduce people to the beauty and wonder of maps. The Ignite format involves a five minute presentation, using only 20 slides. That means I had better get to the point quickly.

Lessons Learned: Trying to be funny (haha) makes you feel funny (strange). I rehearsed my presentation and co-wrote it with two colleagues, Sheila Matano and Jill Scheibler. We laughed so hard making this presentation. But the whole time I kept saying “What if WE think it’s funny, but no one else does? What if other people don’t get it?” Trying to do a dynamic presentation in a new format is scary. Lucky for me the other evaluators in the room liked it as much as we did.

Hot Tips: Practice like your life depends on it. I practiced my Ignite presentation so many times that I had it unintentionally (but not robotically) memorized.

  • Figure out what you want to say, what’s your message? For me it was to convey our enthusiasm and excitement about maps and mapping data and to show others how beautiful that can be, while making them laugh at the same time. We wanted to be funny and irreverent because that’s how we roll here at CRC, so it was a good fit for us, and entertaining for the audience.
  • No more than a handful of words per slide! Words are over-rated. Seriously, don’t read your slides. Doing this in a regular presentation is bad enough, you will be shunned if you do this (or have giant tables full of tiny numbers) in an Ignite presentation.
  • Use the opportunity to show, not tell, what you want to say. We showed good maps and bad maps. We mocked the bad maps and pointed out why the good maps were so easy to understand.

 

  • Don’t be afraid to hack the format. Layer multiple photos onto one slide. For me it meant that the timing had to be down to within 2-3 seconds as we went from image to image, but it was still only 20 slides!

Rad Resources:

  • Then read Jon Udell’s thoughts on how to actually practice the presentation.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating p2i Week with AEA members who have used our Potent Presentations Initiative. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from members who have used p2i strategies in their presentations. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Susan Kistler on Tips and Tools for Presentations From Ignite AEA
  2. John Nash on Creating Outstanding Presentation Slides
  3. Sheila Robinson Kohn on Igniting the Morning!

CrisisWatch N°133

The fight for control of Libya between the Misrata-led Islamist-leaning coalition and the Zintan-led forces is escalating by the day. Hundreds have been killed and thousands displaced in over six weeks of clashes and heavy artillery fire. The Misrata side emerged victorious in the battle over Tripoli’s international airport, taking control of the capital, and made advances around Benghazi, but the larger political divide remains unresolved. A newly formed parliament convened in Tobruk and has the backing of the Zintan-led anti-Islamists and the international community; but the previous legislature in Tripoli challenges its authority. Without a minimum of consensus, Libya is likely to have two ineffectual governments with militias exerting real control on the ground.

IS Back in Business

Emerging in an increasingly chaotic Middle East, IS is profiting from the region’s growing sectarianism, political vacuum and the ambivalence of the West.

Integrating trade in the post-2015 development agenda

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
While trade is more prominent in the current drafts of the new sustainable development goals than it was in the MDGs, the proposed trade targets do not yet provide a framework for tackling the most pressing trade issues, in particular, how countries can insert themselves into global value chains.
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Realist impact evaluation: an introduction

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
Realist impact evaluation is an approach to impact evaluation that emphasises the importance of context for programme outcomes. This introduction will help evaluators and commissioners of evaluations to decide whether a realist approach is appropriate for evaluating the impact of a particular policy or programme.
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ODI Annual Report 2013-2014: global to local action to make a difference

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
​This is a pivotal moment for international development, as the global community sets out its post-2015 development goals, grapples with climate change and tries to create a more effective humanitarian system. At such a time, there is a premium on evidence-based research that offers practical solutions to real problems. This report outlines our 2013–2014 impact on our five strategic priorities, building on a combination of research, advice, convening and communication.
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Our collective interest: why Europe's problems need global solutions and global problems need European action

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
A collaboration between four of Europe’s leading think tanks on international development, this report calls attention to the importance of a global perspective in European policy-making. The EU’s ambitions for its own citizens cannot be divorced from its global responsibilities and opportunities: a collective effort is in our shared interest.
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European Think Tanks Group (ETTG) present to the Committee on Foreign Affairs at the European Parliament

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00

​On the first day the European Parliament resumes, 1st September 2014, Kevin Watkins, Executive Director of the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), is presenting ETTG's key findings to the Foreign Affairs European Parliament Committee in Brussels.

Click here to watch and listen to this event being live streamed.

The European Think Tanks Group (ETTG) is made up of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), Bonn; the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM), Maastricht; Fundacion para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Dialogo Exterior (FRIDE), Madrid; and the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), London.
 

 

 

Categories: Resource Feeds

How to ensure accountability and oversight in security and justice programming

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
​A number of major UK and internationally delivered security and justice programmes have been characterised by a lack of focus on issues of accountability. In this event, Piet Biesheuvel will outline multiple models of accountability, and how accountability affects major security and justice actors. 

Categories: Resource Feeds

How to ensure accountability and oversight in security and justice programming

ODI general feed - Mon, 09/01/2014 - 00:00
​A number of major UK and internationally delivered security and justice programmes have been characterised by a lack of focus on issues of accountability. In this event, Piet Biesheuvel will outline multiple models of accountability, and how accountability affects major security and justice actors. 

Categories: Resource Feeds

p2i Week: Jane Davidson on p2i’s Messaging Model for Workshops

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Sun, 08/31/2014 - 13:06

Potent Presentations aren’t just for paper sessions! This week’s posts, curated by dataviz dynamo Stephanie Evergreen, highlight ways that AEA members have used the Potent Presentations Initiative beyond paper sessions at the annual conference. If you think p2i doesn’t apply to your session type or situation, read on for inspirational guidance!

Kia ora (greetings, from New Zealand), evaluators! I’m Jane Davidson and I’m an evaluation coach, trainer, facilitator, and consultant (check me out at EvaluationCoaching.com).

Looking forward to the AEA conference in Denver? Had a presentation or workshop accepted? Now is the time to start thinking about how to ROCK that room!

Lessons Learned: Ever had one of those “Where do I start?” moments when trying to create a conference presentation? I have had more than one of those, and p2i snapped me out of my mental block! Better still, it’s useful for demo sessions and workshops too!

Rad Resource: Check out my all-time favorites: the p2i Messaging Video and the Messaging Model Handout. These have literally saved me again and again!

Hot Tips: Just this one diagram was pure gold – stick it up on your wall right this second:

Now, be honest, people. Have you ever nailed the background piece of a 15-minute presentation in just 45 seconds? And then gone straight to the bottom line? No, I hadn’t either!

But here’s the really cool thing. I use the same guidelines to plan demonstration sessions, mini-workshops, and even my big 2-day preconference workshop at AEA. When I’m explaining a particular concept, method, or example, I use roughly the same time proportions to make sure I get the message across in the most understandable way.

I particularly love that all-important part at the end: What do you want people to DO differently once they leave your presentation or workshop? For example, the next time someone tells one of my workshop attendees that it’s “all just subjective” whether a result is good or not, I want them to totally nail the response with the great explanation I give them. The p2i Messaging Model reminds me to say so!

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating p2i Week with AEA members who have used our Potent Presentations Initiative. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from members who have used p2i strategies in their presentations. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

Related posts:

  1. Susan Kistler on Remembering the Ides of March and Thinking About Your Message
  2. Susan Kistler on Three Free (+1) Resources for Communications Quality
  3. MNEA Week: Angie Ficek on Learning about Potent Presentations

Dan McDonnell on Time Saving Twitter Tools

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Sat, 08/30/2014 - 05:09

My name is Dan McDonnell and I am a Community Manager for the American Evaluation Association. With the vast amount of different social analytics and measurement tools that exist – particularly for Twitter – it can be time consuming to research the ins and outs.  Today, I’ll be giving a brief overview of a handful of tools, in a quick hits-like format to help you find the best tools to enhance your use of social media – without the need for hours of research!

Rad Resource: Twazzup – Evaluate Hashtag Data
Twazzup lets you dig into keyword or hashtag data on Twitter with a quick search. While the typical Twitter search just returns the most recent (and popular) related Tweets, Twazzup pulls a list of the top influencers who Tweet with your searched term – a great way to find new, interesting people to follow.

Rad Resource: Commun.it – Manage Your Network

Commun.it makes it easy to keep in touch with your Twitter followers by providing helpful suggestions. In addition to daily insights, Commun.it reminds you to @reply to followers, and updates you on suggested people to follow or unfollow based on recent activity. With one click, you can give a shout out to your top followers to say ‘Thanks!’

Rad Resource: Topsy – Listen Better

Topsy is like Google Alerts, but for Twitter. Set up monitoring filters to comb Twitter and email you updates on when certain keywords or hashtags are mentioned. It’s a great way to get by the minute updates on a particular topic on Twitter. Quick tip – set up a topsy mention to monitor your blog URL, so you can see when people link to you on Twitter!

Rad Resource: Buffer + Feed.ly – Share Cool Stories on Twitter, Later!

I’ve mentioned Buffer before, but I thought it worth mentioning again in tandem with Feed.ly, an RSS feed reader, as it’s one of my favorite tool combinations. Add your favorite blogs and feeds to Feed.ly, and if you have a Buffer account set up (on your PC or your phone), a Buffer Icon will appear as a share icon below each post in the feed. Simply click the Buffer button on any article that you want to share on Twitter, and Buffer will let you customize your Tweet, and automatically schedule it to go out at a later time. It takes just two clicks to share each news item, blog post or story with your network, so this is a tremendous time saver.

Related posts:

  1. Dan McDonnell on Using Buffer to Save Time While Tweeting
  2. Dan McDonnell on Making New Friends and Mastering Lesser-Known Twitter Features Without Third Party Apps
  3. Dan McDonnell on 5 Social Media Tools For Curation and Visualization

SEA Week: Dr. Moya Alfonso on the Benefits of Being A Grant Reviewer

American Evaluation Association 365 Blog - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 01:15

My name is Moya Alfonso, and I’m an Assistant Professor at Georgia Southern University and University Sector Representative and Board Member for the Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA), a regional affiliate of the American Evaluation Association (AEA).

So, you need to improve (or develop) your grant writing skills and perform service. A perfect way to address both of these needs is to serve as a grant reviewer!

Lesson Learned: I have honed my grant writing skills by reviewing for local nonprofits, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Education, and learning what is expected and seeing the mistakes made by others.  At the same time, I performed an important service to the fields of public health and educational research and evaluation.

Hot Tip: Select the Right Opportunity. When looking for opportunities to be a grant reviewer, consider where your strengths lie. If you’re a program evaluator with a background in education, for example, the Department of Education might be a good place to start. Targeting opportunities will increase your odds of being selected for a review panel – even if you are new to reviews.

Hot Tip: Know What You’re Getting Into. So you’ve found an opportunity that is right up your alley. Now what? It’s time to determine logistics. If detailed information is not provided in the call for reviewers, contact the review administrator about in-person versus remote reviews, estimates of time required, number of applications assigned, grant review dates or time periods, and travel reimbursement or stipends.

Hot Tip: Be Critical Yet Constructive. There’s nothing worse than receiving a “Great Job!” back from a reviewer. No one is perfect. Read (and reread) each application with an eye toward both its strengths and weaknesses. Keep feedback constructive; there is no room for personal insults in grant reviews.

Hot Tip: Know You’re Not Alone. Grant reviewers typically serve on panels comprised of individuals with a variety of perspectives and skill sets. You are not expected to know everything! Feel free to draw upon the wisdom of your grant review administrator and your fellow reviewers.

Hot Tip: Don’t Trust Technology. Technology is amazing – when it works! When completing reviews, you will likely need to learn new technology to complete your reviews. Don’t trust it! Perform your reviews in a word processing program, save your files to your computer, and use the copy and paste functions to complete your reviews.

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Southeast Evaluation Association (SEA) Affiliate Week with our colleagues in the SEA Affiliate. The contributions all this week to aea365 come from SEA Affiliate members. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Related posts:

  1. Leslie Goodyear on Serving as a Reviewer for the National Science Foundation
  2. STEM TIG Week: Susan Eriksson on Scientists Becoming Evaluators
  3. SEA Week: Sean Little on Book Reviewing for Skill Growth

Food prices update August 2014

ODI general feed - Fri, 08/29/2014 - 00:00
ODI’s Food Price Updates focus on tracking international prices of key staple cereals maize, rice, and wheat, and provide commentary on events in markets that affect these prices. They also follow international food and commodity price indices. This update includes a section on the effects of El Nino.
Categories: Resource Feeds